HHSA Newsroom

Mobile Crisis Outreach Time Rolls Out to Provide 'On-the-Spot' Urgent Mental Health Care

Published February 5, 2019
  • Community Education

MCOT(Above: Meet Pete and Patty, a clinician and case manager duo that make up the new Mobile Crisis Outreach Team.)

For years, when there’s been an emergency mental health crisis, many have turned to 911. But thanks to HHSA, a Mobile Crisis Outreach Team is now available to respond to lessen the burden on police by  providing quick, compassionate care to struggling residents.

The Mobile Crisis Outreach Team hit the streets January 1, providing on-the-spot urgent mental health services to people suffering severe mental illness, including those who may  be chronically homeless. Using funds from the Whole Person Care program, HHSA contracted with Hill Country Health and Wellness to staff and manage the team.

“For quite some time we have been hearing from law enforcement that many of their calls can be mental health in nature,” said HHSA Adult Services Director Dean True. “Having a mobile crisis team join them on a call would both greatly improve services to those in need, and potentially free up officers faster.”

This resource is a benefit not only for the client, but for the broader community. In addition to reducing pressure on police, there is also hope the program will reduce costly, unnecessary trips to hospital emergency rooms.

(Picture below: The mobile crisis team's RV has a bathroom, kitchen and other amenities to provide for basic needs).

MCOT Interior

How It Will Help

Therapist Pete Myers and case manager Patty Price will be available to work closely with RPD and assist them with calls including 5150 involuntary psychiatric holds or immediate safety issues.  

For example, say police are called out to a home by a concerned family member whose loved one is talking about harming themselves. If the person in crisis isn’t saying anything that qualifies for 5150, the mobile crisis team can take over, develop a treatment plan, and make connections to needed services. The team may expand to include more staff if it’s determined the need is there.

A re-purposed RV serves as the mobile office and is equipped with amenities for basic needs, such as access to a sink, toilet and kitchenette. Being able to provide these simple necessities gives clients a break from the elements and lowers stress levels so they can participate in treatment.

“Having mental health professionals available to respond directly into the community will greatly increase the chance of positive outcomes,” True said. “We are excited to bring this much needed service to our community, and greatly appreciate Hill Country’s latest collaboration with the county in providing a more comprehensive continuum of care.”

The team operates out of the Hill Country C.A.R.E. Center located at 1401 Gold St. in Redding, from 8:30 a.m. to 5 p.m., Monday through Friday.

For general information about services, call (530) 238-7133. For urgent response call (530) 238-7134.


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Contact Community Relations:

Amy Koslosky, Supervising Community Education Specialist, (530) 225-5970

Christopher Diamond, Media Liaison for Stand Against Stigma, In-Home Support Services, Adult Services and Mental Health, and alcohol and drug programs., (530) 229-8484

Jill Haskett, Media Liaison for CalWORKs, CalFresh, Medi-Cal,  Work Readiness, Women, Infant and Children (WIC) programs, Adult Protective Services, and other immediate need services, (530) 229-8413

Tim Mapes, Media Liaison for public health programs, Healthy Shasta, Emergency Preparedness, Foster parent programs and programs for children, (530) 245-6863

Jeri Butler, Senior Public Health Assistant, (530) 225-3689

Front Desk, (530) 245-6862

If your media liaison is not available and timely information is needed, please contact another media liaison.